WITHOUT A TRACE – Marilyn Armstrong

FOWC with Fandango — Trace


I have lost people that were important to me. I don’t mean they died, though I suppose they could have. They have simply vanished. They have no presence on social media or in any of the look-ups on the internet. They are gone.

They aren’t doing anything illegal, at least not as far as I know and I doubt they are hiding from Interpol or the FBI. They have just vanished, or as the television show put it, “Without a Trace.”

Periodically I try to look them up. I don’t necessarily even want to talk to them. It has been a lot of years. I doubt I have much to say. I merely want to know if they are okay.

But they are gone. With all of the intense social media everywhere, some people drop off the edge of the world. Perhaps that is what they wanted, for whatever reason.

For me, they are missing, without a trace.

WITHOUT A TRACE

“Without A Trace” was a television show where the FBI searched for missing people, often children.

It was a pretty good show. It went off the air a few years ago along with a lot of shows we used to watch. Speaking of “without a trace,” so many of the shows we used to watch have ended and the replacements are … well … not so wonderful.

We like “Bull”, Michael Weatherly’s new one. He’s really still Tony from NCIS, but more mature and a lot less annoying. They have removed his childishness, which was his least attractive characteristic and I’m glad his show is doing well.

We finally turned off “The Black List” the other night. I loved the show when it came on.  James Spader as Raymond ‘Red’ Reddington was a complex, lethal, but fascinating character. Somewhere during this past year, they seem to have lost their path. In some attempt to make the show “different,” it merely became intensely brutal and violent with revolving plots about the exact same stuff they supposedly fixed in previous seasons. I hope they find their feet again. Sooner would be nicer than eventually.

So much of our television has moved to the streaming channels of Roku. Netflix and Acorn are the big winners and last night, finally, season five of “House of Cards” came back to our screens.

It’s still an amazing show, but reality has so altered since “House of Cards” went on the air, that the bizarre stuff they are doing in fiction hardly seems crazier than what our so-called government is doing. That is not the fault (obviously) of the show. It just demonstrates how bad things have gotten here in the United States. How terribly frightening. There’s nothing they can do in fiction that we aren’t sure is being done for real in Washington DC.

Yesterday, many shows were talking about the death of John Fitzgerald Kennedy. We watched him speak. We listened to the elegance of the language, the hopes for our future and the future of the world. We mentally compared it to the travesty of our current government.

Personally, I cringed. The United States has become an embarrassment internationally, a horror show domestically. A shame. An indignation. A frightening joke among the world’s players.

How did we let ourselves fall to this? How could this happen?