SKETCHBOOK 48 – REQUIESCAT IN PACE

Garry feels I’m getting very thematic and he’s right. It isn’t accidental. I’ve been conjuring images from our cemetery. Not every drawing is brilliant, but they are definitely a series. My favorite character is Death in Terry Pratchett’s wonderful, brilliant, amazing series, Discworld. It is funny, witty, thoughtful and I think I’ve read the entire series three times — and there are more than 40 books. Each time I read them, I feel like I have learned something.

“Waiting is” is from Robert Heinlein’s “Stranger in a Strange Land”

I also have always loved this poem. Without getting deeply involved in religious thought, thought there is much in here to ponder, there is a tsunami of truth in this sonnet.

Death, be not proud

BY JOHN DONNE

Death, be not proud, though some have called thee
Mighty and dreadful, for thou art not so;
For those whom thou think’st thou dost overthrow
Die not, poor Death, nor yet canst thou kill me.
From rest and sleep, which but thy pictures be,
Much pleasure; then from thee much more must flow,
And soonest our best men with thee do go,
Rest of their bones, and soul’s delivery.
Thou art slave to fate, chance, kings, and desperate men,
And dost with poison, war, and sickness dwell,
And poppy or charms can make us sleep as well
And better than thy stroke; why swell’st thou then?
One short sleep past, we wake eternally
And death shall be no more; Death, thou shalt die.



Categories: Arts, Death and Dying, Drawings, poem, Poetry, Sketchbook

Tags: , , , , ,

11 replies

  1. Missing comment again. Apologies if it shows up twice. 🙄 I love this poem. I was a morbid little thing when I was a teenager and Donne just suited me. As did Poe, and any Gothic writer. Your art work is amazing and you are so versatile! What a wonderful talent! 🙂

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    • It’s probably like the other one in spam. It’s a WP thing.

      Our water just stopped working. I’m waiting for the well guy. And we’ve got mice, so I’m also waiting for the rodent guy. I feel like jumping from a high window.

      Like

    • So the well guy came and fixed it. I’m writing about it. It’s so weird it’s almost funny. You just hit my brain at that exact moment when I realized we had no water AND we have mice nesting in the house. I feel like we are under siege. The moment something gets fixed, something else breaks.

      Donne wrote a series of these sonnets, all religious and used in actual sermons. I actually thought this was kind of beautiful. Okay, I was probably a morbid teenager too, but I think most teenagers are a bit morbid. When you are very young, you can afford to love dark stuff. When you get old, you really prefer to not go there if you don’t have to. I couldn’t read the same books now that I read back then.

      I can’t afford to be morbid. It would be to much like predicting my extinction — which I feel like is happening anyway.

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  2. Hi Marilyn, thanks for introducing me to this poem. It sounds familiar but I can’t place a finger on when I’ve heard it before. I am enjoying this series of pictures.

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    • Donne was a minister or priest — probably minister — in Elizabethan England. This was called a “Holy Sonnet” and was religious in nature. The first couple of lines of commonly quoted, so you’ve probably heard them, but few people show the entire sonnet.

      These two lines:

      “Death, be not proud, though some have called thee
      Mighty and dreadful, for thou art not so;”

      are probably the most familiar. The sonnet has been around since 1633 so you’ve probably heard it and just don’t remember where or when.

      Liked by 1 person

  3. wonderful drawing and great poem choice. one of my older grandsons loves terry pratchett and is reading everything he wrote

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  4. Very interesting poem. Love your drawing

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