CARS AND TRUCKS – Marilyn Armstrong

Cee’s Fun Foto Challenge: Cars and Trucks

Out here in the country, I don’t feel as surrounded by internal combustion vehicles as I did in the cities in which i lived: New York, Jerusalem, and Boston. I feel safer crossing the street, safer breathing the air.

Most of the world lives in much more densely populated quarters. I often wonder if any of them remember breathing air that wasn’t at least just a teensy weensy bit polluted.

WHERE’S THE BUS STOP? Marilyn Armstrong

This is the kind of normal question that anyone might ask in any town anywhere. Except if you ask it here, the responder will look at you quizzically. Because honest Abraham of Civil War fame, we don’t have any public transportation in this town.

If you need to go somewhere, you have a choice.

You can walk. You can hop on your bike, assuming it isn’t the middle of winter with roads full of snow and ice and you’re still young enough to do it. You can saddle up your horse (or hitch up the buggy) … or jump in whatever vehicle you own.

That’s it. I’m told that way back before we were living anywhere, they used to have a bus. I would certainly not object to having a mini-bus so old folks — like me — could get into town without having a driver. So far, no go, but I live in hope.

No Uber. No Lyft. No taxi. Nothing unless you drive. There are train tracks, but the trains don’t stop here and anyway, they are all freight trains, not for passengers.

We have tracks, but lack trains

Most people don’t take their horses to town, but it has happened. It makes the horses nervous, though and carrying back the groceries can be a bit clumsy. So mostly, it’s feet, trucks, and cars. We’re about 3-1/2 miles out of the village and we are definitely past hoofing it.

This is casket truck. Everyone needs a traveling casket, right?

Or maybe something smaller?

Public transportation isn’t part of the rural lifestyle. At some point, the trains did stop here. I only know it because we have a converted train station that’s now a real estate office. But once upon a time, it was an actual passenger station.

Does a school bus count?

School bus, in town. I think you need to be attending a local school to get a lift!

Photo: Garry Armstrong

CEE’S FUN PHOTO CHALLENGE: TRUCKS WITH SOME BLUE – Garry & Marilyn Armstrong

Cee’s Fun Foto Challenge: Oh so many choices!

Take your pick. Garry actually went out to take some pictures today, but didn’t get as many as usual. First, because he got caught by a fan who was also a photographer and by the time the conversation ended, the sky had darkened considerably. Blue and gray had turned almost black and dark. Rain was coming!

A truck or a mural. An octopus, whale, or a rich color of blue. Or, for that matter, water! It’s going to be a very rewarding experience I’m sure!

I find I have no whales or octopi. I’ve very good on trucks and while I lack any murals, I do have some mosaics. And I’m totally sure I’ve got a plethora of blue.

Photo: Garry Armstrong – Two trucks doing road repair. Actually not doing anything, but in theory, road repair.

Photo: Garry Armstrong – Trucks in downtown Douglas

It’s a mosaic because we don’t have any murals. But it’s an old one and it’s all about shearing sheep and marketing the wool. The best of Uxbridge!

Blue spiderwort

A very blue counter in an old Mendon diner

THE 7-DAY BLACK & WHITE CHALLENGE – DAY 2 – A SECOND ROUND

Sue Vincent from Sue Vincent’s Daily Echo, a wonderful site and definitely a thinking person’s website. Anyway, she hailed me to come join this challenge. Again. And I said yes. Why not?

I did this first time around on behest of Judy Dykstra-Brown. Sometimes, getting roped into something is just what we need. My black & white photography never got the energy and effort I’ve used for color photography. This project improved my work.


“Seven days. Seven black and white photos of your life.
No people. No explanation. Challenge someone new each day.”


Having directly or indirectly finagled more than a few people to join this challenge a few weeks ago, I’d feel a bit bashful asking them again, but I invite you to consider giving this challenge a go, even if you’ve done it already. A push to do better work is always good for your art. Moreover, finding a good black & white picture that represents “you” in some interesting visual way poses an interesting mental challenge — an artistic double-whammy, so to speak. At least one of the pictures I used in the first round of challenges turned out to be one of my most popular-ever posts.

Who’d have thunk it.

YOU CAN PUT IT IN A VERY BIG GARAGE

Cee’s Fun Foto Challenge: Things with Motors for House or Garage

I’m going to start this off by pointing out that you need to “define garage.” If we are talking “average homeowner’s garage, that’s pretty limited. But if we are talking airplane-hangar garage, well, then. We could fit anything in there, including our entire house. Of course, our house isn’t (yet) on wheels, but I often wonder if we might be better off if it were.

And another two from Garry. Being as this is a new car lot, I would guess that all of these would fit perfectly into any garage. All you need is the price of the ticket and a good relationship with your local bank.

Photo: Garry Armstrong

Photo: Garry Armstrong

GENTLEMEN, START YOUR ENGINES!

CEE’S BLACK & WHITE PHOTO CHALLENGE: THINGS WITH ENGINES OR MOTORS

This week’s topic is Things with Engines or Motors (cars, planes, trains, fans, air conditioners, lawn mowers, etc). Your photos can show the actual engine or motor. It can also be objects that have motors or engines. So there really is quite a wide variety of possibilities for this week’s challenge.

And I have lots of candidates just waiting for this challenge!

OLD THINGS – CEE’S BLACK AND WHITE CHALLENGE

CEE’S BLACK & WHITE PHOTO CHALLENGE: OLDER THAN 50 YEARS

This week’s topic is Older Than 50 Years (1965). The one question everyone asks if you can have people over 50. The answer is yes, but I would hope they have a lot of character and are closer to age 100. The possibilities for this challenge are endless.

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Living in this part of New England, many things around here (including us) are old — and still very much in use. Barns and houses, old trucks and cars. Old mills and farm equipment to name just a few.

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Hadley tiny church BW december

Old Number 2 wheel

WHICH WAY TO GO IN A WORLD OF SNOW

Cee’s Which Way Photo Challenge: 2015 Week #8

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I was out in the car with Garry yesterday for the first time in more than a week. I was forcibly reminded how strange the world looks when piles of snow obscure common landmarks, how changed the outline of familiar places become.

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How can I know

Which is the right way to go

In a world full of snow?

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A WALK IN THE WOODS – SYMBOLIC JOURNEY AND PHOTO GALLERY

Cee’s Which Way Photo Challenge: 2014 #27

My favorite road pictures. From different places, different times … and for a variety of reasons. Since I started taking pictures, I’ve been searching for the perfect path, the one that symbolizes life. Over the past 40 years, I’ve expanded my search from woodland paths, to roads of all kinds, including canals and railroad tracks. There is something inherently symbolic about a path.

There used to be a game we played. Not really a game, more like a mental imaging exercise. I originally heard it in the 1960s when I was in college. I was told it wasn’t psychology, but rather drew on symbolism, images out of mythology and folklore. And, of course, our subconscious.

If you feel inclined, come along with me. The meanings, to the degree I understand them, are at the bottom of the page after the photo gallery. I’m pretty sure if you Google this, you’ll find other versions.

1. Imagine you are going to take a walk in the woods. What kind of day is it (sunny, cloudy, raining, warm, cold, summer, winter, autumn, spring)? It can be anything, whatever you see.

2. There is a path ahead of you. Describe the path (open and clear, full of rocks and other hazards, overgrown, etc.).

3. What is the woods like? Pine? Hardwood? Does the sun filter through?

4. As you walk along the path, you see a structure. What is it? It can be any kind of structure — house, shed, ruin, church, modern — anything. Describe it, please. Does anybody live there? Are they home? Do you go inside? How do you feel about the place?

5. Now it’s time to leave the house. You are back on the path and you come to a body of water. What kind of water (stream, river, ocean, lake, puddle, creek, swamp, etc.). You need to get to the other side. How do you cross the water? (Let your imagination roam free!)

6. Having crossed the water, you rejoin the path. As you stroll or stride along the path, you look down and see a cup. What does it look like? Do you pick it up? Keep it or not?

7. Further down the path, you spy a bear. What is the bear doing. What do you do about the bear?

8. You have passed the bear and you have walked a distance until you come to a wall. What does the wall look like? Can you see over it? Do you know (or can you see) what is on the other side of the wall?

What it means, as I learned it:

1. The walk is life and the day is how you see life — dark or bright, shadowy or sunny. All that you see is part of your vision of life. Whether or not there are obstacles in the path, or the path is clear is also part of it. The nature of the woods is also descriptive of how you see life.

2. The structure is your childhood. Many people see a storybook house, gingerbread or the woodsman’s cottage out of Hansel and Gretel. Some people find it terrifying. Some people go inside and don’t want to leave.

3. The body of water indicates how you feel about the challenges in your life. The body of water can be just a puddle that you step over, or an ocean that requires you conjure up an ocean liner to cross. It can be deep and dark, scary or someplace lovely into which you want to wade or swim. How difficult (or easy) it is to cross the water talks about how you feel about overcoming obstacles you {did, are, will} face.

4. The bear is responsibility. Some people run, others freeze. Some people make friends with the bear and it accompanies them on the rest of the walk. It’s all in your imagination and there are no limits.

5. The wall is death. The most common things to see on the other side are a beautiful mansion (heaven?) … more forest (reincarnation or just a continuation?) … the ocean … One guy saw a burning forest (ouch). What you see is what you see and it may not be what you expect.

I have done this several times at different ages and stages of my life. My answers were different each time, reflecting the current me.

What little I know of this is its origins are probably late 1890s, England. Hope you enjoyed your walk!

A GALLERY OF WAYS

Cee’s Which Way Photo Challenge: 2014 #24

Welcome everyone to Cee’s Which Way Challenge. This challenge is about the roads, walks, trails, and rails we travel as we move from place to place. You can walk, climb, drive, ride, as long as the way is visible.


Trains and tracks, trucks and roads. Boats on rivers, in harbor, on the ocean. Planes in the air. Going every which way.

THE DEVIL’S IN THE DETAILS

Cee’s Fun Foto Challenge: Vehicle Details

If the devil is in the details, so are the best pictures … at least when you are talking about vehicles.

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Old trucks. Rusty with age and honor.

It's a fire engine!

It’s a fire engine!

old number 2 two side view

But wait! What about … a shiny antique car? Oh, here’s one!

antique car heritage

And motorcycles … a few of them maybe?

Motorcycles count too, don't they?

Motorcycles count too, don’t they?

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