LITERALLY AS OPPOSED TO FIGURATIVELY – Marilyn Armstrong

FOWC

Literally. Not figuratively. Because figuratively means “related to or analogous to” but it doesn’t mean “factually the same.”

This is one of those frequently used terms that’s often misunderstood. Literally has nothing to do with literature. I’m sure the “lit” part comes from some Greek or Latin root word but is not a literal interpretation of the expression “literally.” Figuratively speaking.

Speaking literally means that what you are saying is true. It’s not an analogy or something that’s similar to something else. If you say “That is literally what happened” you are saying this is not an exaggeration or some other kind of relationship to the whatever it was.

It’s what happened. Really. No kidding. It’s the news. Maybe it’s the news roundup. It is true.

Remember true? Literally is true, just like I said it.

9 thoughts on “LITERALLY AS OPPOSED TO FIGURATIVELY – Marilyn Armstrong”

  1. We older folks try to be accurate in our speaking and writing, but since neither “figuratively” nor “literally” are likely to be used in text messages, I doubt the younger folks will care about the difference. Good post anyway, Marilyn.

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