BASEBALL AND A LOSS OF INNOCENCE – GARRY ARMSTRONG

A friend took me to a Red Sox Game at Fenway Park. It was the middle of April, so there was a chill in the wind. I layered up and topped it off with my retro Brooklyn Dodgers tee-shirt. It was Jackie Robinson day. Everyone was wearing the fabled #42.

red sox 42 jackie robinson day
April 15, 2016 – Fenway Park

April is the beginning of the new baseball season, when hope springs eternal. Anything could happen. The haves and have-nots are equally in the race. For me, it’s also when I open the cookie jar of memories, mentally racing around the bases to those days when I listened to our boys of summer on the radio.

Vin Scully was a 20-something rookie broadcaster, calling his first season of Brooklyn Dodgers games.

The Korean “conflict” dominated the radio news, which preceded the important stuff, baseball. The Brooklyn Dodgers were “America’s Team” in 1950. Vin Scully was a new breed of sports broadcaster. He mixed in stories about President Truman’s desegregation of our Armed Forces and “discontent” about the integrated Dodgers’ team.

Scully used phrases like “Goodnight, sweet Prince”,  after Jackie Robinson turned in another memorable game amid jeers from rabble-rousers. It was curious to this young fan who dreamed of becoming a team-mate of Jackie Robinson, Peewee Reese, and Duke Snider. I’d wear Dodger Blue with pride, I promised myself.

I thought it would be wonderful if they played baseball all year round and the stories would always be about the Bums and the dreaded New York Yankees. Heck, it would be terrific to listen to Vin Scully and not those other people talking about grown up stuff. Scully even mentioned things we were studying in school and made them sound exciting. I’ll never forget his referring to April as “the cruelest month.” I’d steal that line a zillion times.

A couple of decades later, opportunity opened the door to meetings with Jackie Robinson, Roy Campanella, and other fabled Boys of Summer. Campy was friendly and outgoing, eager to share stories with a newbie reporter. He would say, “Life is good, young fella. You gotta appreciate it.”

Jackie Robinson would glare at Campy as he wove the stories of good times with the Dodgers. Sometimes, he would interrupt Campanella with a sharp, “Enough, Roy. Enough of that fiction.”

72-Jackie-Robinson-Baseball-HOF_038

Robinson would turn to me, his eyes blazing, seemingly angry. “Life isn’t a ball game, young man,” he once said.  Then, he gently patted me on the shoulder, noting that I was a good conversationalist and listener.  It was a bit confusing. It happened that way several times.

People like Campy, Peewee Reese and even a reluctant Duke Snider would share that Jackie Robinson was a very complicated man on a mission.

PBS is again running Ken Burns’ two part portrait of Jackie Robinson. It goes beyond myth and legend to examine Robinson, the man. The man from Cairo, Georgia was so much more than the athlete who broke baseball’s racial barrier. The inner turmoil, anger, frustration, and multiple health issues took Robinson from us way too early, at age 53.

1950. So long ago. A time of innocence for many young boys like me.


Another year has rolled to its finale. It’s the middle of December. In a few weeks, it will be 2018.

Vin Scully retired. Though the world is not running short of baseball commentators, no one can match his style, his class, his understanding of the game, or the poetry he added to his commentary.

In baseball, the winter meetings are in progress. Are we going to make a deal? We need a slugger. We picked up someone, but he’s the kind of slugger who is no kind of fielder and misses the ball a lot. I suppose as a DH, maybe. I guess we’ll see. Before I look around, spring training will begin. Maybe the world will seem all fresh and new in the spring.

Roy Moore lost in Alabama. For the first time in 25 years. A Democrat for the Senate. I guess they decided to not elect a pedophile after all. Even in Alabama, there are limits and a glimmer of decency. Doug Jones — one more vote against the horrors of Trumpism.

Baseball has been a saving grace for me during this otherwise disgraceful year of political ugliness and international ill-will. I wonder if a World Series win would fix it? Somehow, I doubt it. We need more than a ballpark win this year.

9 thoughts on “BASEBALL AND A LOSS OF INNOCENCE – GARRY ARMSTRONG

  1. slmret December 15, 2017 / 12:17 am

    Baseball is a wonderful escape from the vagaries of politics and other aspects of daily life, especially with commentators like Vin Scully — unfortunately time marches on, but there will be other good players and callers! Hurray for Doug Jones — the Senate may not have the votes to approve the tax bill now, with Jones in and McCain and one other questionable! And hopefully the world is not burning up this year!

    Liked by 2 people

    • Marilyn Armstrong December 15, 2017 / 12:20 am

      I’m hearing there are a couple of others not on board. This may not be as sure a thing as they thought a few weeks back. Got my fingers crossed.

      Liked by 3 people

    • Garry Armstrong December 15, 2017 / 12:19 pm

      Slmret, beisbol (and old movies) — my frequent escape/s from reality (Last night, I watched “Alexander’s Rag Time Band (Fox/’38) for the FIRST time. It was a classic ’30’s musical with a big basket of Irving Berlin tunes Wonderful!). These days,it’s so hard to tell the difference between reel and real life.

      MERRY CHRISTMAS, Slmret!

      Liked by 2 people

      • slmret December 15, 2017 / 12:57 pm

        That sounds like a wonderful escape!! It is difficult to determine what is real and what is fake! I’m not sure where I’ll be for Christmas — it all depends on a fire — but please enjoy yours!

        Liked by 1 person

  2. slmret December 15, 2017 / 12:32 am

    I agree, although I think the Conference Committee saved some of the worst of it!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Marilyn Armstrong December 15, 2017 / 1:40 am

      I heard that too. But they dumped net neutrality, despite a huge number of people saying no, so who knows what they’ve got in the fine print.

      Liked by 1 person

  3. swo8 December 15, 2017 / 1:20 pm

    April will soon be here, Garry.
    Leslie

    Like

  4. evelyneholingue December 15, 2017 / 6:04 pm

    Born and raised in France is my only excuse for being ignorant of the baseball rules. I’ve only seen one game in my entire life. And it was before I moved to the States, in New York Ciy where I was for a couple of weeks as a tourist. But I had hoped that my son would love to play since I adore the uniform 🙂
    Alas, he preferred playing with drum sticks than with a baseball bat.
    Like you, I would do anything to end the current nightmare. And if going to a baseball game was all it took, count me in.

    Like

  5. judyt54 December 15, 2017 / 7:50 pm

    Excellent post, Garry. And fear not, April will be here in just a few months.

    It’s always good to dream, and remember the good parts. Sometimes it’s all we have to cling to. Thank you for this.

    Like

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