THE UGLY GARDEN

FOTD – June 18 – The Ugly Garden

Terrible things happened to our front garden this year. It has always been messy but this year, it has gone beyond messy into downright ugly. Binding, strangling vines are everywhere and things are growing I’ve never seen before. Maybe they are offshoots from fallen birdseed?

Daylily. More will come
Spiderwort. We got a huge growth of them this year
Catalpa is blooming
Thorny roses coming up
Wild daisies

Anyway, I took pictures. I skipped the really hideous parts. Just try imagining them. Strangling vines and binding weeds and tall unidentifiable things growing. I have no idea what they are. None. I probably never will. I’m seriously thinking of removing the entire garden, excepting the rhododendron.



Categories: cee's photo challenge, Flower of the day, Flowers, FOTD, Gardens, Photography

Tags: , , , , , ,

9 replies

  1. PERHAPS THE BIRD DROPPINGS DID PRODUCE SOME UNWANTED PLANTS. ONE YEAR WE HAD WATERMELONS GROWING IN OUR CURBSIDE PATCH. PASSERS BY SOON ALMOST STRIPPED THE MELON VINES. WE HADN’T PLANTED THEM AND NOBODY ELSE APPEARED TO CLAIM THEM, SO WE ATTRIBUTED THE GIFT TO THE BIRDS.

    Like

    • Considering that the birds love eating the bittersweet seeds, it’s very likely they dropped it in the yard. It’s good food for them, but it’s wrecking the garden. 20 years of working that garden wrecked in ONE month by one awful weed.

      Like

  2. Is there one small spot of the garden that you see a lot that can be given a new lease of life. I’m only thinking of a square yard or two. Contemplating the whole is way too much.

    Like

    • The big — serious — problem is the arrival of bittersweet, a strangling vine that has moved up north from our southern states. It grows incredibly fast, strangles EVERYTHING from trees to day lilies. All you can do is try to keep pulling it up, roots and all, but it has a deep root and you have to be careful you don’t cause the rock wall to collapse.

      AND it’s ugly. From the birds point of view, it’s good eating producing a lot of berries that the birds love to eat. That’s probably how we got it in the first place. The birds brought it. It’s such a fast grower that in a matter of two days, it can grow feet. I don’t know if we can save the front garden. We can cut it back after the daylilies bloom, though how much they will bloom with the bittersweet trying to kill them, I don’t know. They aren’t doing well. I didn’t think ANYTHING could stop the daylilies.

      All these “imports” from overseas and other places in the country are really wrecking the garden. It’s also causing a lot of damage in the woods because this stuff also likes to strangle trees. It took us a while to identify it, but we finally found someone who said, “Yes, bittersweet. Sorry about that.”

      We still have some control over the back garden, but that’s because it hasn’t grown in yet, so we can at least reach the bittersweet and pull it up — and there’s no stone wall to worry about, In front, I think we’ve already lost.

      Like

      • Oh what a nightmare. I’ve just been reading this: https://treehozz.com/how-do-you-get-rid-of-bittersweet-vine
        and though it indicates that control is possible, it still sounds a nightmare. Simply cutting the vine is hard work, but it might be an option with some to at least to stop it fruiting. Then there are the chemical options including white vinegar, but that doesn’t sound too brilliant either – risk of killing everything around it.

        Like

        • You’d have to be out there cutting it every day. It grows really really FAST. Owen and I pull it up every day, but by the next day, it’s back. We did two full cleanouts of this garden twice this month as well as going at it with the big loppers. They have long handles, so i can reach further into the garden. I have been defeated. We have other binding vines — ye olde bindweed which is wild honeysuckle that at least smells good, wild grape vine, and Virginia creeper, but this stuff is BAD.

          I won’t use any kind of poison no matter how supposedly benign. Too many birds. A neighbor once decided to poison his crabgrass and all the robins died in their nests. It was horrible. That was one of the worst things I ever saw, watching the robins literally fall over dead. We still don’t have many and we used to have dozens of them.

          It’s interesting that they recommend Roundup because THAT was what killed all the Robins. It’s absolutely lethal to many small birds and probably some of the small creatures.

          Liked by 1 person

          • I agree. Spraying is definitely a bad idea. The most effective method, though very time-consuming is applying it to a cut in the cut stem. Repeat cutting will also eventually cause the root system to die – a long-term process obviously.

            Like

  3. The flowers you’ve included here are very pretty, Marilyn. Garden’s are a lot of work.

    Like

Talk to me!

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Our Eyes Open

Come along on an adventure with us!

Travel with me

Travel snapshots from Toonsarah

Thoughts & Theories

My Personal Rants, Ravings, & Ruminations

France & Vincent

Writing Magic, Myth and Mystery

Barb Taub

Writing & Coffee. Especially coffee.

This, That, and The Other

Random musings on life, society, and politics.

Keep it alive

A look at life, achieving good physical and mental health and happiness

Covert Novelist

Light Hearted Mysteries

Salted Caramel

Blogging, Motivation, Lifestyle and much more.

Sarah's Attic Of Treasures

Making My Home A Haven is important to me. Sharing homemaking skills. Recipes and food. Bible Studies. This is a treasure chest of goodies. So take a seat. Have a glass of tea and enjoy. You will learn all about who I am.

Green Screen

The Environmental Movie Podcast

bushboys world

Photos of my world and other stuff I hope you will enjoy too. Photos taken with Canon PowershotSX70HS Photos can be purchased.

musingsofanoldfart

Independent views from someone who offers some historical context

My Blog

Just another WordPress.com site

National Day Calendar

Fun, unusual and forgotten designations on our calendar.

Cee's Photo Challenges

Teaching the art of composition for photography.

Trent's World (the Blog)

Random Ramblings and Reviews from Trent P. McDonald

Views from the Edge

To See More Clearly

serial monography: forgottenman's ruminations

wandering discourse, pedantic rant, self-indulgent drivel, languorous polemic, grammarian's bête noire, poesy encroachment approaching bombast, unintended subtext in otherwise intentional context, unorthodox unorthodoxy, self-inflected rodomontade, …

draliman on life

Because sometimes life just makes you stop and think

The English Professor at Large

Posts about old Hollywood, current concerns

sparksfromacombustiblemind

EMBERS FROM SOMEONE DOGGEDLY TRYING TO MAKE SENSE OF IT ALL...

The Day After

Musings, Photography, Writing, and More

THE SHINBONE STAR

NO LONGER ENCUMBERED BY ANY SENSE OF FAIR PLAY, EX-JOURNALISTS RETURN TO ACTIVE DUTY TO FIGHT THE TRUMPIAN MENACE!

Chronicles of an Anglo Swiss

Welcome to the Anglo Swiss World

ScienceSwitch

Your Source For The Coolest Science Stories

A Day In The Life

People, Places, Nature, LIFE!

%d bloggers like this: