NEW WORDS? WHAT ABOUT THE OLD ONES? – Marilyn Armstrong

RDP Saturday – Fleek


A what? Or is it a which? Or perhaps a twitch? Maybe it’s the rhymer for the word “week” when you are babbling rhymes. I managed to get three definitions from various online dictionaries:

(1)   FLEEK: flēk/ adjective INFORMAL in the USA

Extremely good, attractive, or stylish. As in: “my hair is on fleek right now.”

Why do you need the “on”? How come this a word requires a proposition or possibly, a preposition? Who made up that rule?

If I grow up, I want to become a dictionary designer. I will make up new words as I go along and never offer any hints about what they mean. Hah! That will chill their tail-pipes!

(2)  From the “Urban” or perhaps “Urbane” Dictionary:

A shitty word made by shitty people with no fucking lives.
Dumbass: “My eyebrows are on fleek!”
Me: “Who the fuck cares?” — by wastetimechasingmemes

(3) On Fleek: Born (or maybe it just floated in from another reality) in a Vine video on June 21, 2014, the term fleek is a busy word. It was originally (and still is most commonly) applied to perfectly-groomed eyebrows, but the word has been used to describe everything from hash browns to skateboards.

Making sure your third eye is on fleek.

(4) Fleek or  “on fleek“:  A word used by people whose intent is set on decimating the English language, thus further depleting the ever-dwindling repository of individuals capable of intelligent conversation.

(5) Wiktionary – On fleek – Adjective. on fleek (comparative more on fleek, superlative most on fleek) (slang, of eyebrows or hair) Sleek and perfectly groomed or styled. quotations; (slang, of an article of clothing or outfit) Stylish and perfectly chosen or put together.

The next time I have my eyebrows waxed, I know the precise word to use. My Vietnamese eyebrow waxer doesn’t understand even basic English so this will be as meaningless to her as it is to me.

Author: Marilyn Armstrong

Writer, photography, blogger. Previously, technical writer. I am retired and delighted to be so. May I live long and write frequently.

26 thoughts on “NEW WORDS? WHAT ABOUT THE OLD ONES? – Marilyn Armstrong”

              1. Me too, but that was because we didn’t speak the same language. Amazing how a guy who speaks only Russian and a woman who speaks only English can make dates, see movies, and actually have a relationship. But we did.

                Liked by 1 person

    1. I’m pretty sure that fleek is a noun requiring a preposition. Actually, the word literally means nothing to me. I’ve gotten to a point where so many words are meaningless. They are just noises.

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  1. I see that many of the people who commented before I did noted an unsavory similiarity to another word…a word that was guaranteed, in some households, to get the kid a) yelled at, possibly using the ‘bad’ word, b) their mouth washed out with some horrid tasting soap, c) the parent/authority figure having to leave the room because they were laughing hysterically. Ah I like that actually. Fleek it! Nobody can accuse one of cussin’ using THAT, although they may wonder what’s wrong with the person speaking…

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  2. HA! Maybe Fleek doesn’t even exist!? Maybe it was a typo by Nelson in his log when he was tired?
    “Dispatch the Fleek! Post hence!” No one would dare challenge him. He was Nelson. And the rest is his story. I mean ‘History’.

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